Doctrinal Statement: God

What is God like, and what does he do? My second doctrinal statement looks at the Nature and Work of God. These are works in progress, but this is what I have thus far.

Nature of God

There is one true God who is eternal and exists in inherent relationship (Gen 1:26). God is a spirit (John 4:24) and exists in the three coeternal persons of the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, who are personally distinct, but essentially united, comprising one “What” and three “Who’s” (Gen. 1:2, Matt. 3:16-17, John 14:11, 16-17, 1 Pet 1:2). They are equal in character and essence, and thus are equally qualified to receive worship (John 4:24, 20:28). The persons of the Godhead are all knowing, wise, and powerful, and present everywhere (Ps. 139:1-10, Jer. 32:17, Rom 16:27, Dan 4:35). The first person of the Trinity is fully God in essence and character and is specially working his purpose and plan, by which we are elected and adopted in love to the praise of the glory of his grace (John 6:37, Eph 1:3-14).

As a relational being, God is personal (Gen. 3:9) and has chosen to come near and reveal himself to us as YHWH, calling himself compassionate, gracious, loving, faithful, forgiving, patient, yet justly judging evil (Ex. 34:6-7). God is eternal, unchanging and infinite in his being, character, power, purposes, promises and knowledge (Num. 23:19, Mal. 3:6) but does change his attitudes and actions in response to our prayers, and resistance or repentance (Jeremiah 18:6-10, Jon. 3:10). He is loving, faithful, good, holy, just, and true (1 Jn. 4:8, Deut. 7:9, Ps. 34:8, Isa. 6:3, Deut 32:4, 1 Jn. 5:20). These attributes are objective characteristics of his nature and are rooted in his essence.

Work of God

God’s plan is eternally and sovereignly based on his gracious character, such as his infinite wisdom, knowledge, and power (Eph. 1:4, Rom. 11:33, Ps. 139:1-6, Rom.16:27, Jer. 32:17, Ps. 115:3, Dan. 4:35) and thus is not arbitrary or capricious. He is at work in all things, and is in control and will bring his purposes and plan to pass for the sake of his glory, in spite of many who make decisions which are contrary to and resist his will and desire (Ps. 33:10-11, 1 Chr. 29:11-12, Eph. 1:11). God hates sin, and is not its author, nor does he approve it (Jas. 1:13, Jer. 44:4, Zech. 8:17). God commands righteousness and forbids sin, even promising judgment as a result (Mic. 6:8, Ex. 20:1-17), but allows people limited, contrary choice for which they are always responsible (Isa. 1:18-20, Isa. 6:8, Rom. 2:6). To bring about his perfect plan in this broken world (Gen. 3:16-19), God limits and frustrates evil and is loving and powerful enough to do good even in the worst evil and suffering (Gen. 50:20, Jn. 18:28-30).

God chose, before the foundation of the world, to give every spiritual blessing to certain people, who are those in Christ (Eph 1:3-4). God chose some because he foreknew that they would respond to his calling in faith, and chose others purely on the basis of his sovereign purpose (1 Pet. 1:1-2, Rom. 8:29, Acts 13:48, Gal. 1:15). Some are in Christ as a result of God’s irresistible redemptive grace (Acts 9:4-7, Gen. 12:1-4) and others as a result of God’s resistible redemptive grace that he gives to all mankind (Tit. 2:11, Rom. 2:4-10). Those responding by faith to God’s gracious offer of salvation in Jesus Christ in no way merit salvation by their acceptance of the free gift, as the entire debt was paid by Jesus (Eph. 2:8-9, Rom. 3:22-28). God desires that all would be saved (1 Tim. 2:3-4, 2 Pet. 3:9) and draws all people to himself, but his kindness is rejected by many (Jn. 12:32, Rom. 2:5, Rev. 20:12-15).

God created from nothing and then formed that which he had made into the universe that exists by his word and for his glory (Gen. 1:1, 2:7, Ps. 33:6-7). God is transcendent and distinct from his creation, but his creation is entirely dependent on him and his immanent interaction with it. In his active providence he governs, preserves and upholds all things by his Word (Ps. 103:19, Col. 1:15-17, Heb. 1:3). He lovingly provides in order to bring about his redemptive end through the course of history and gives people a degree of partnership in ruling the world.

Your thoughts on God, or on what I’ve written?

Take a look at my first doctrinal statement which explores the doctrine of Revelation.

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2 thoughts on “Doctrinal Statement: God

  1. Pingback: Elsewhere (01.07.2011) « Near Emmaus

  2. Pingback: Doctrinal Statement: Person of Christ | What I See

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